Increase of Religious Non-Identifiers in America

April 10, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, News

religionThere is a documented and marked decline since 1990 in the number of Americans espousing a religious identity, from less than one-tenth of the public to nearly one in every six adults today. Far from being randomly distributed in the population, the data portray non-identifiers as more likely than those expressing a religious affiliation to be young, male, living in the West and New England, moderate-to-liberal politically, and unmarried.

A lingering question for this research is whether the decline in psychological affiliation with any church or denominational organization will persist, level off, or reverse course. Will the decline in religious identification observed in this research continue or prove to be a temporary phenomenon?

If the question is meant to refer to the traditional, established churches and faith systems that have been with us for some time, the answer is very likely to be yes, it is likely to continue. But if we expand the concept of “religion” to include the increasingly popular forms such as New Age religions, EasternWestern blends, multi-stranded hybrids, the “small-group movement,” pseudo-scientific spiritual formulations, and other types, then maybe no.

This study is an excerpt from the larger report on The Decline of Religious Identity in the United States by Sid GroenemanGary Tobin published in 2004 via the Institute for Jewish & Community Research (http://jewishresearch.or)

Religious Characteristics of Non-Identifiers

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, News

followjesus26% No past religion, no current attendance, no religion in future

19% Past religion, no current attendance, no religion in future

11% Past religion, no current attendance, possible religion in future

11% Past religion, current attender, possible religion in future

10% Past religion, current attender, no religion in future

9% No past religion, current attender, no religion in future

8% No past religion, no current attendance, possible future religion

6% No past religion, current attendance, possible religion in future

This study is an excerpt from the larger report on The Decline of Religious Identity in the United States by Sid GroenemanGary Tobin published in 2004 via the Institute for Jewish & Community Research (http://jewishresearch.or)

Church-Growth Characteristics

December 5, 2003 by  
Filed under News

Growth begins with investment in a process which will cause change. Churches which experience dynamic growth focus on the following important dynamics:
(1) Genuine experiences of the presence of God;
(2) High level of self-motivation;
(3) Unified vision and purpose;
(4) Clear goals;
(5) Pioneering or establishing a precedent;
(6) Finding people in the community and building relationships in the church structure;
(7) Relevance to their location and culture;
(8) Teaching activities and services designed to understand and to be understood;
(9) Encourage participation and commitment;
(10) Strong leadership;
(11) Quick to implement positive changes;
(12) Not afraid to abandon unnecessary traditional programs.

Such dynamics will draw people to your church.